Saturday, December 10, 2016

SBCMS News

rss

Read the latest medical news for the San Bernardino County area.


Deadline extended to dispute 2015 PQRS and QRUR findings

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released data that indicates which physicians will be subject to the 2017 payment penalties associated with the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) and Value-Based Payment Modifier (VM) programs. Today, CMS announced that physicians who have concerns about the findings in their report(s) have until December 7 to file for an informal review of their data.

The penalties in question stem from policies in effect prior to the enactment of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). Failure to successfully complete required PQRS reporting in 2015 will result in a 2 percent penalty in 2017. VM penalties can range from 1 to 4 percent, depending on the size of the practice and its performance on cost and quality measures. PQRS penalties will be communicated to physicians by mail as well as in the PQRS feedback reports posted on the CMS website. VM penalties can be found in the Quality and Resource Use Reports (QRUR), which are only posted on the website.

Physicians may access both their 2015 PQRS feedback reports and QRURs on the CMS Enterprise Portal using an Enterprise Identity Management account. For details on how to obtain your QRUR report, see “How to obtain a QRUR” on the CMS.gov webpage. For information on obtaining your PQRS report, see the “Quick Reference Guide for Accessing 2015 PQRS Feedback Reports.” For information on understanding your report, see the “2015 PQRS Feedback Report User Guide.” Both of the PQRS guides are available on the PQRS Analysis and Payment webpage.

Those who have questions, even if they are uncertain about penalty status, are urged to submit a request for informal review. Although in most cases a successful PQRS review will trigger an automatic review of related VM penalties, program officials say the safest course is to file requests for review of both PQRS and VM data.

All informal review requests must be submitted electronically through the Quality Reporting Communication Support Page by December 7, 2016, at 11:59 p.m., ET. Physicians wishing to request an informal review of their QRUR and VM results should contact the Physician Value Help Desk at (888) 734-6433 (select option 3) or pvhelpdesk@cms.hhs.gov. CMS also has published the “2017 Value Modifier Informal Review Request Quick Reference Guide.”

Practices will be contacted by email with a final decision from CMS within 90 days of the original request for an informal review. All decisions will be final, with no opportunity for further review. Practices that do not receive a response are encouraged to check their junk or spam email folders for the decision.

For additional questions, please contact the QualityNet Help Desk at (866) 288-8912 [TTY: (877) 715-6222] or via qnetsupport@hcqis.org between the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., CT, Monday through Friday.

For information regarding other Medicare physician quality programs that apply payment adjustments, please see the Value-Based Payment Modifier website.

For step-by-step instructions on how to implement PQRS, view the How to Get Started page. Additionally, the California Medical Association (CMA) updated its resource, “2016 PQRS and Value-Based Modifier Getting Started Guide,” which is available free to CMA members in the resource library at www.cmanet.org.


2017 Medicare fee schedule includes $140 million in additional funding for primay care

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on Wednesday released the final 2017 Medicare physician fee schedule. The fee schedule transforms how Medicare pays for primary care through a new focus on care management and behavioral health, which is expected to result in an additional $140 million in payments next year for physicians providing these services.

The 2017 physician fee schedule focuses on improving Medicare payments for services provided by primary care physicians for patients with multiple chronic conditions, mental and behavioral health issues, and cognitive impairment or mobility-related disabilities.

These changes will improve payment for clinicians who are making investments of time and resources to provide more coordinated and patient-centered care. These coding and payment changes will better reflect the resources involved in furnishing contemporary primary care, care coordination and planning, mental health care and care for cognitive impairment, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

According to CMS, the coding and payment changes in the 2017 fee schedule could over time lead to $4 billion or more in additional support for care coordination and patient-centered care.

The rule also begins to implement the California Medical Association (CMA) sponsored California Geographic Practice Cost Index (GPCI) fix, which will overhaul California’s outdated geographic payment localities. This reform will raise payment levels for 14 urban California counties misclassified as rural, while holding the remaining rural counties permanently harmless from cuts (the hold harmless provisions will take effect in 2018).

All California payment localities will transition to Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The transition to the new localities starts next year, with higher payments being phased in over a six-year period (2017-2022). Unfortunately, the California GPCI malpractice expenses and rent expenses went down in California and many other regions of the country. Therefore, most California physicians will experience an overall GPCI rate reduction in 2017. The general GPCI cut would have been larger if the California GPCI fix was not being simultaneously enacted. (To see the net GPCI payment impact by region, click here).

The fee schedule also finalizes the CMS proposal to expand the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) model to all Medicare patients at risk of developing type 2 diabetes starting January 1, 2018. Expansion of the DPP model will help at-risk seniors and people with disabilities lower their risk factors and prevent their condition from advancing to type 2 diabetes. This marks the first time a prevention model from the CMS Innovation Center will be adopted.

For more information, see the CMS fact sheet.

CMA and the American Medical Association are reviewing the details of the final rule and will provide additional information in the near future.


Don't forget: Last day to change your Medicare participation status for 2017 is December 31

Once again, it’s time for physicians to decide if they want to make changes to their Medicare participation status. Physicians have until December 31, 2016, to make changes for 2017.

Although Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) penalties will not kick in until 2019, there are two more years of penalties that will be applied based on 2015 performance—tied to the meaningful use, Physician Quality Reporting System and Value-Based Modifier reporting programs. This will also decrease the limiting charge amounts that nonparticipating physicians can bill to patients for unassigned claims.

As always, physicians have three choices regarding Medicare: Be a participating provider; be a non-participating provider; or opt out of Medicare entirely. Details on each of the three participation options are as follows:

  • A participating physician must accept Medicare-allowed charges as payment in full for all Medicare patients.

  • A non-participating provider can make assignment decisions on a case-by-case basis and bill patients for more than the Medicare allowance for unassigned claims. Non-participating physician fees are 95 percent of participating physician fees. If you choose not to accept assignment, you can charge the patient 9.25 percent more than the amounts allowed in the participating physician fee schedule (which equates to 15 percent of the non-participating fees).

  • Physicians who opt out of Medicare are bound only by their private contracts with their patients. Medicare's limiting charges do not apply to these contracts, but Medicare does specify that these contracts contain certain terms. When a physician enters into a private contract with a Medicare beneficiary, both the physician and patient agree not to bill Medicare for services provided under the contract.

Physicians who want to change their participation status for 2017 must send a letter to Noridian, California’s Medicare contractor, postmarked by December 31, 2016.

The California Medical Association (CMA) also has information on physicians' Medicare participation options in CMA On-Call document #7209, "Medicare Participation (and Nonparticipation) Options." On-Call documents are free to members in CMA's online resource library at www.cmanet.org/cma-on-call. Nonmembers can purchase On-Call documents for $2 per page.

Physicians can also visit CMA’s MACRA resource center at www.cmanet.org/macra to better understand the payment reforms and access resources to help with the transition. The center is a one-stop-shop with tools, checklists and information from CMA, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the American Medical Association and national specialty society clinical data registries.

Contact: Cheryl Bradley, (213) 226-0338 or cbradley@cmanet.org.


Physicians have until November 30 to dispute 2015 PQRS and QRUR findings

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released data that indicates which physicians will be subject to the 2017 payment penalties associated with the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) and Value-Based Payment Modifier (VM) programs. Physicians who have concerns about the findings in their report(s) have until November 30 to file for an informal review of their data.

The penalties in question stem from policies in effect prior to the enactment of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). Failure to successfully complete required PQRS reporting in 2015 will result in a 2 percent penalty in 2017. VM penalties can range from 1 to 4 percent, depending on the size of the practice and its performance on cost and quality measures. PQRS penalties will be communicated to physicians by mail as well as in the PQRS feedback reports posted on the CMS website. VM penalties can be found in the Quality and Resource Use Reports (QRUR), which are only posted on the website.

Physicians may access both their 2015 PQRS feedback reports and QRURs on the CMS Enterprise Portal using an Enterprise Identity Management account. For details on how to obtain your QRUR report, see “How to obtain a QRUR” on the CMS.gov webpage. For information on obtaining your PQRS report, see the “Quick Reference Guide for Accessing 2015 PQRS Feedback Reports.” For information on understanding your report, see the “2015 PQRS Feedback Report User Guide.” Both of the PQRS guides are available on the PQRS Analysis and Payment webpage.

Those who have questions, even if they are uncertain about penalty status, are urged to submit a request for informal review. Although in most cases a successful PQRS review will trigger an automatic review of related VM penalties, program officials say the safest course is to file requests for review of both PQRS and VM data.

All informal review requests must be submitted electronically through the Quality Reporting Communication Support Page by November 30, 2016, at 11:59 p.m., ET. Physicians wishing to request an informal review of their QRUR and VM results should contact the Physician Value Help Desk at (888) 734-6433 (select option 3) or pvhelpdesk@cms.hhs.gov. CMS also has published the “2017 Value Modifier Informal Review Request Quick Reference Guide.”

Practices will be contacted by email with a final decision from CMS within 90 days of the original request for an informal review. All decisions will be final, with no opportunity for further review. Practices that do not receive a response are encouraged to check their junk or spam email folders for the decision.

For additional questions, please contact the QualityNet Help Desk at (866) 288-8912 [TTY: (877) 715-6222] or via qnetsupport@hcqis.org between the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., CT, Monday through Friday.

For information regarding other Medicare physician quality programs that apply payment adjustments, please see the Value-Based Payment Modifier website.

For step-by step instructions on how to implement PQRS, view the How to Get Started page. Additionally, the California Medical Association (CMA) updated its resource, “2016 PQRS and Value-Based Modifier Getting Started Guide,” which is available free to CMA members in the resource library at www.cmanet.org.


California GPCI fix implementation to begin in January

Last week, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the final Medicare physician fee schedule for 2017, which begins implementation of the long overdue overhaul of California’s outdated geographic payment localities.

The California Geographic Practice Cost Index (GPCI) fix will update California’s Medicare physician payment regions and raise payment levels for 14 urban California counties misclassified as rural, while holding the remaining rural counties permanently harmless (starting in 2018) from cuts.

All California payment localities will transition to Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The transition to the new localities starts next year, with higher payments being phased in over a six-year period, from 2017-2022.

Unfortunately, the GPCI malpractice expenses and rent expenses went down in California and many other regions of the country. This means that most California physicians will experience an overall GPCI rate reduction in 2017. The general GPCI cut would have been larger if the California GPCI fix was not being simultaneously enacted.

Click here
to see the net GPCI payment impact by region.

Contact: Elizabeth McNeil, (800) 786-4262 or emcneil@cmanet.org.


MACRA does not create new reporting burdens, is significant improvement over existing law

On October 14, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued the final rule to implement the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, known as MACRA. The final regulation represents a significant improvement over the existing Medicare payment system and quality reporting programs.

The California Medical Association (CMA), the American Medical Association (AMA) and 788 other physician organizations supported the MACRA legislation because it reduces the administrative burdens in the Medicare fee-for-service quality and electronic health record (EHR) reporting programs. The MACRA legislation and the implementing regulations revised the existing reporting programs and will significantly reduce the administrative burdens on physicians. Contrary to popular myth, MACRA does not create new reporting burdens.

Legislative intent

  • Repeal the Medicare sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, which threatened payment cuts and stagnated physician payments for over a decade.
  • Allow physicians to develop innovative physician-led alternative payment models.
  • Provide stable annual updates in the Medicare fee-for-service program.
  • Consolidate, streamline and reduce the administrative burdens in the Medicare quality and EHR meaningful use reporting programs.

Penalties lower, bonuses higher
Before MACRA, physicians were facing double-digit SGR payment cuts and 11 to 13 percent or more in payment penalties for not meeting the all-or-nothing requirements in the three Medicare reporting programs (Physician Quality Reporting System, EHR Incentive Program and Value-Based Payment Modifier).

Under MACRA, physicians will be exempt from penalties in 2019 if they report on just one quality measure in 2017.  In 2020, the maximum penalty is 5 percent, eventually going up to a maximum of 9 percent in 2022, but physicians would have faced much higher penalties under the pre-MACRA payment rules. Before MACRA, the Medicare bonus payments had all expired. MACRA restores bonus payments of up to 9 percent, plus an additional bonus for exceptional performance.

Click here to see a chart that compares current law payments, bonuses and penalties to MACRA.

Improvements over current law

Though not perfect, the final MACRA rule, which takes effect January 1, 2017, is clear improvement over current law. While CMA is still reviewing the final rule, below are key improvements that CMA and AMA fought to achieve:

  • Restores the 0.5 percent payment update for 2017.
  • Exempts one-third of all Medicare physicians from MACRA's Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) reporting program.
  • Eliminates all of the meaningful use and value modifier quality measures.
  • Reduces by half the remaining number of measures that physicians must report, from 30 to 15. Small and rural practices must report on even fewer measures.
  • Eliminates the EHR Clinical Decision Support and Computerized Physician Order Entry measures.
  • Eliminates penalties in 2019 (for the 2017 performance period) for physicians who report for one patient on one quality measure, one improvement activity OR the four EHR measures.
  • Only requires physicians to report for 90 days in 2017 to receive a bonus in 2019.
  • Only requires physicians to report on 50 percent of their patients in 2017 for the quality category.
  • Mostly eliminates the pass/fail system and provides proportional credit for the measures that are met.
  • Providers will not be scored on "resource use" (physician cost) in 2017
  • Expands the types of alternative payment models (APM) that can participate in MACRA, most notably Track 1 accountable care organizations. The final rule also reduces the financial risk requirements for APMs.

CMA will continue to fight for improvements to the MACRA regulations and the law to reduce the administrative burdens and open up more opportunities for fair payment.

For a summary of the final MACRA rule, visit https://qpp.cms.gov.

Physicians can also visit CMA’s MACRA resource center at www.cmanet.org/macra to access information and resources to help with the transition. The center is a one-stop-shop with tools, checklists and information from CMA, CMS, AMA and national specialty society clinical data registries. CMA will add an updated summary and materials, including additional webinars, to the resource center in the coming weeks.

MACRA final rule exempts one-third of Medicare physicians from MIPS

Nearly a third of Medicare physicians could be exempt from Medicare's new merit-based incentive payment system (MIPS) under the final rule implementing the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). The rule was released today by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

In the final rule, CMS raised the low-volume threshold, so that providers with less than $30,000 in Medicare payments or fewer than 100 Medicare patients are exempt from the MIPS reporting requirements. The earlier proposed rule would only have exempted physicians with less than $10,000 in Medicare payments.

Other key highlights of the final rule include:

  • Restores the 0.5 percent payment update for 2017
  • Reduces by half the number of measures that physicians must report, from 30 to 15.
  • Lets physicians pick their pace of participation, and will not penalize physicians who at least attempt to report on a few measures
  • Only requires physicians to report for 90 days in 2017 to receive a bonus
  • Providers will not be scored on "resource use" (physician cost) in 2017
  • Mostly eliminates the pass/fail system and will provide proportional credit.
  • Expands the types of alternative payment models (APM) that can participate in MACRA, most notably Track 1 ACOs. The final rule also reduces the financial risk requirements for APMs.
Today’s final rule reflects additional steps taken by CMS to reduce the regulatory burden on physicians, but concerns remain. Physicians already spend 785 hours a year on quality reporting activities. For every hour physicians provide direct clinical face time with patients, nearly two additional hours are dedicated to paper and desk work.

“Physicians, particularly small and rural practices, need flexible and streamlined systems to support the high-quality patient care we provide,” said California Medical Association (CMA) President Steve Larson, M.D., MPH. “From day one, CMA urged CMS to delay the MACRA reporting period and provide a longer transition timeline for small medical practices and exempt them from penalties. We applaud today’s announcement, and we appreciate that CMS will offer full participation and bonus payment eligibility to medical practices ready for MACRA on January 1, 2017.”

It is clear that CMS listened to physicians. The final rule is a vast improvement over current law and the initial proposed rule.

The final rule is nearly 2,400 pages – the result of a CMS listening tour with nearly 100,000 attendees and 4,000 public comments.

“CMA is reviewing and assessing the impact of the complex rule,” said Dr. Larson. “We remain committed to ensuring that MACRA allows more innovative, physician-led alternative payment models and lessens the reporting burdens on everyone.”

For a summary of the final MACRA rule, visit https://qpp.cms.gov.

Physicians can also visit CMA’s MACRA resource center to better understand the payment reforms and access resources to help with the transition. The center is a one-stop-shop with tools, checklists and information from CMA, CMS, AMA and national specialty society clinical data registries. CMA will add an updated summary and materials, including additional webinars, to the resource center in the coming weeks.

View the CMA resource center at www.cmanet.org/macra.


California Medical Association responds to final MACRA implementation rule

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) today released the final implementation rule for the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), which aims to reform the Medicare physician payment system.

The California Medical Association (CMA), American Medical Association (AMA) and nearly every other physician organization supported the bipartisan legislation because it was intended to provide stable payment updates, significantly reduce the quality reporting program burdens, reinstate bonus payments and allow innovative, physician-led alternative payment models.

“Physicians, particularly small and rural practices, need a modernized, flexible and streamlined system to support high-quality patient care,” said CMA President Steven E. Larson, M.D., MPH. “From day one, CMA urged CMS to delay the MACRA reporting period and provide a longer transition timeline for small medical practices, as well as exempt them from penalties. We applaud today’s announcement, which included additional exemptions and the elimination of penalties during the first year of implementation even for physicians that attempt to report on a few measures, as well as the delay in the 2017 reporting period. We also appreciate that CMS will offer full participation and bonus payment eligibility to medical practices ready for MACRA on January 1, 2017.”

Today’s final rule reflects additional steps taken by CMS to reduce the regulatory burden on physicians, but concerns remain. Physicians already spend 785 hours a year on quality reporting activities. For every hour physicians provide direct clinical face time with patients, nearly two additional hours are dedicated to paper and desk work.

“CMA is reviewing and assessing the impact of the complex final rule,” said Dr. Larson. “We remain committed to ensuring that MACRA allows more innovative, physician-led alternative payment models and lessens the reporting burdens on everyone.”

Physicians should visit CMA’s MACRA resource center to better understand the payment reforms and access resources for the transition. The resource center is a one-stop-shop with tools, checklists and information from CMA, CMS, AMA and national specialty society clinical data registries. The final rule is nearly 2,400 pages – the result of a CMS listening tour with nearly 100,000 attendees and 4,000 public comments. CMA will add an updated summary and materials, including additional webinars, to the resource center in the coming weeks.

TWEET THIS NEWS

.@cmaphysicians applauds CMS for including additional exemptions/eliminating penalties in 1st year of implementation http://cal.md/2dPZLoJ

.@cmaphysicians remains committed to ensuring #MACRA allows more innovative/physician-led alternative payment models http://cal.md/2dPZLoJ

“Physicians need a modernized, flexible and streamlined system to support high-quality patient care.” @cmaphysicians http://cal.md/2dPZLoJ

#   #   #

The California Medical Association represents the state's physicians with more than 42,000 members in all modes of practice and specialties. CMA is dedicated to the health of all patients in California. For more information, please visit cmanet.org, and follow CMA on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


AMA introduces new MACRA payment model evaluator

The American Medical Association (AMA) has introduced a new online tool to help physicians evaluate the various new Medicare payment models and improve their opportunities for success under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), which will go into effect in 2017.

The AMA Payment Model Evaluator is a free interactive tool offering initial assessments to help physicians determine how their practices will be impacted by MACRA. Once physicians or medical practice administrators fill out the online questionnaire, they will receive guidance on participating in the MACRA payment model that is best for them. They will also receive relevant educational and actionable resources.

To help physicians understand the MACRA payment reforms, and what they can do now to start preparing for the transition, the California Medical Association (CMA) has created a MACRA resource center. There you will find an overview of MACRA, and a comprehensive list of tools, resources and information from CMA, AMA and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

View the CMA resource center at www.cmanet.org/macra.


Podcast series: Inside Medicare's new payment system

Changes to the Medicare payment system are on the horizon, and physicians around the country are wondering how the new Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) will impact their practices. The American Medical Association (AMA) and ReachMD have produced a podcast series to provide physicians with an inside look at what’s to come and what they can do now to prepare for the transition to MACRA.

Hear from industry experts and physician leaders about their experiences with new payment models, quality reporting and more. Available episodes include:

  • Implementing MACRA: The AMA’s Keys to Advancing Opportunities, Avoiding Pitfalls
  • APMs in Cancer Care: The Patient-Centered Oncology Payment Model
  • The Rise of Specialist-Driven Alternative Payment Models in American Medicine
  • Thoughts on Physician Advocacy and Payment Reform with AMA President Andrew Gurman, M.D.
  • The Future of Medicare Payment Reform: Perspectives on MACRA with CMS's Andy Slavitt
To listen to the podcasts, click here.

More MACRA resources

To help physicians understand MACRA payment reforms, and what they can do now to start preparing for the transition, the California Medical Association (CMA) has published a MACRA resource center.

There you will find an overview of MACRA, and a comprehensive list of tools, resources and information from CMA, AMA and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

View the resource center at www.cmanet.org/macra.


Tags

ACA Advocacy Affordable Care Act AMA American Medical Association Anthem Blue Cross Billing/Coding Blue Shield Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Child Health and Disability Prevention Program Cigna CMA Capitol Insight CMA Foundation CMA Nominations CME CMS Continuing Medical Education Contraception Covered California CPLH CURES Department of Health Care Services Department of Managed Health Care DHCS Drug Prescribing Dual Eligible EHR Election Electronic Health Record Emergency Rooms Emergency Services End of Life Issues Exchange Plans Federal Legislation Fee Schedule Flu Food and Drug Administration Fraud and Abuse Grace Period Health Benefit Exchange Health Care Reform Health Disparities Health Information Technology Health Insurance Exchange HIPAA HIPAA Privacy Rule HIT Hospital Medical Staff House of Delegates ICD-10 Immunization IMQ Incentive Payments Infectious Diseases Influenza Institute for Medical Quality Insurance Insurance/Reimbursement Legal Advocacy Legislative Advocacy MACRA Managed Care Match Day Maternal and Child Health Meaningful Use Measles Medicaid Medi-Cal Medical Board of California Medi-Cal Cuts Medical Malpractice Medical Provider Networks Medical Records Medical School Loans Medical Staff Medical Students Medicare Medicare Transition MICRA NEPO Network Adequacy Network of Ethnic Physician Organizations Noridian Nurse Practitioners Opioids Organ Donation Palmetto Payor Contracting Payors Pediatrics Peer Review Pertussis Physician Aid in Dying Physician Assistants Physician Leadership Physician Payment Sunshine Act Physician Payments Sunshine Act Physician Quality Reporting System Physician Wellness Physician Workforce Political Advocacy POLST PQRS Practice Management Practice Resources Prescription Drugs Professional Liability Prop. 56 (tobacco tax) Provider Networks Public Health Quality of Care Quality Reporting Recovery Audit Contractor Regulatory Advocacy Residents and Fellows Rural Health Save Lives California Scope of Practice Seminars SGR Smoking State Legislation State Legislative Advocacy State Legislature Sustainable Growth Rate Tax Tobacco Tobacco Tax Tricare Underserved Communities United Healthcare United States Supreme Court Vaccination Veterans Webinars Western Health Care Leadership Academy Workers' Compensation Zika Virus ACA Access to Care Advanced Care Planning Advocacy Aetna Affordable Care Act Alcohol AMA American Lung Association American Medical Association Amicus Briefs Anthem Blue Cross Anthony York antibiotic resistance Audits Awards Ballot Measures Billing/Coding Blue Shield Cal MediConnect CalHIPSO California Physician's Legal Handbook California State Budget California Supreme Court CALPAC CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Cigna Clinical Laboratories CMA Capitol Insight CMA Foundation CMA Foundation (CMAF) CMA Governance CMA Policy CME CME Accreditation CMS Conferences Continuing Medical Education Covered California CURES Department of Health Care Services Department of Insurance Department of Public Health DHCS Drug Abuse Drug Prescribing Dual Eligible EHR Election Electronic Cigarettes Electronic Health Record End of Life Issues Exchange Plans Federal Legislation Federal Legislative Advocacy Fraud and Abuse Geographic Practice Cost Index GPCI Graduate Medical Education Grassroots Advocacy Health care reform Health Information Technology Health Insurance Exchange HIPAA Hospital Accreditation Hospital Medical Staff House of Delegates I Heart Immunity ICD-10 Immunization Immunizations IMQ Infectious Diseases Institute for Medical Quality Institute for Medical Quality (IMQ) Insurance Insurance/Reimbursement Legal Advocacy Legal Issues Legislative Advocacy Licensure MACRA Managed Care Meaningful Use Medi-Cal Medical Board of California Medical Malpractice Medical School Debt Medical School Loans Medical Students Medicare MICRA Network Adequacy Noridian Palliative Care Payor Contracting Physician Leadership Physician Wellness Physician Workforce Political Advocacy Practice Management Practice Resources Preauthorization Prescription Drugs President's Message Professional Development and Licensure Professional Liability Prop. 56 (tobacco tax) Provider Directories Public Health Quality of Care Quality Reporting Regulatory advocacy Scope of Practice SGR Smoking State Legislation Stepping Up to Leadership Sustainable Growth Rate Tobacco Tobacco Tax United Healthcare Workers' Compensation
Who We Are   |   For Members   |   Advocacy   |   Events   |   Community Programs   |   Patient Resources   |   Media
Copyright (c) 2016 San Bernardino County Medical Society